Staying Safe in the Summer: Sharing the Road with Motorcycles

sharing the road with motorcycles
Being courteous when sharing the road with motorcycles and other cars is the best way to prevent accidents.

Sharing the road with motorcycles is something every driver has to experience, especially as the weather gets warmer and warmer here in Marshall, Texas. There are some key safety tips to keep in mind when driving alongside bikers, tips that will protect both you and them. There’s room for both cars and motorcycles on the road—as long as everyone is safe.

According to wikiHow, one of the most important things to keep in mind is to give extra room. Try and keep 4 to 5 seconds between you and the motorcycle in front of you. Although you might think this is excessive, our brains often fail to account for the small size of motorcycles, making it likely that you are riding closer to that bike than you think.

Always look twice when turning. Again, we are often hardwired to overlook motorcycles on the road. A quick glance is not enough when you are turning. Always be sure to look left, right, and left, ensuring you stay safe. If you want to throw in some extra looks to the left and right, it can’t hurt.

Signal, signal, signal. Road conditions affect motorcycles more than cars, making it imperative that you give them as much time as possible to react to what your car is doing. If you are changing lanes, put on your signal as early as possible if bikes are around. This will prevent any swerving on their part, something that is especially dangerous on two wheels.

NHTSA Gives 2014 Malibu 5-Star Safety Rating

Chevrolet and GM announced the 2014 malibu 5-star safety rating.
The 2014 Chevrolet Malibu scored high on NHTSA’s frontal, side-impact and rollover crash tests.

The 2014 Malibu 5-Star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is another Chevy victory.

Undergoing severe testing procedures, the 2014 Chevrolet Malibu received high scores in the frontal, side-impact and rollover crash tests.

Chevy’s standard safety features for the 2014 Malibu include:

  • 10 airbags including knee airbags for driver and front passenger
  • Rollover protection
  • Anti-lock brakes
  • Daytime running lights
  • Electronic stability control
  • OnStar service for six months

GM’s general director of Vehicle Safety and Crashworthiness, Gay Kent, states that safety is a top priority for the automaker.

“Safety is an increasingly important consideration for new vehicle buyers, especially for those in the midsize segment,” Kent said in a press release. “The customer is at the center of our day-to-day operations and when we design vehicles, it’s their safety that we have in mind.”

Perhaps you’re looking for a midsize sedan that will guarantee your safety. The 2014 Chevrolet Malibu will meet your expectations. Check out our inventory and visit us for a test drive!

New Year’s Day is Christmas for Car Thieves

New Year's Day is Christmas for car thieves.
Watch out for this guy at this time of year!

While Christmas for car thieves tends to be a day off from their illegal behaviors, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day are quite the contrary.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau’s study from 2012 suggests that no car is safe when the clock hits midnight. On January 1, 2013, 2,228 cars were stolen, and 2,152 car thefts reportedly happened the day before.

It’s important that car owners be on high alert at this time of year. Here are some tips to keeping your car out of the wrong hands.

  • Park in well-lit areas. Car thieves are more likely to break into a car where they can’t be seen.
  • Hide your valuables. Stow personal items away in a compartment or in the trunk.
  • Keep your car locked. Whether you’re driving, warming up your car or leaving it for one second, don’t leave it unlocked in your absence.
  • Install an anti-theft system. A security program is one of the best ways you can prevent your car from being stolen

If there is a chance you may cross paths with a car thief, give them your keys. Don’t try to be Batman! Call the police immediately, and you may end up getting your car back.

Practice Safe Driving this Winter Season

Practice safe driving this winter
Drive safely this holiday and winter season.

While no one may mess with Texas, the upcoming season calls for drivers to practice safe driving this winter and pay special attention to their cars.

Whether you’re traveling this holiday season or heading to work on a morning of light snow, you need to be extra careful and follow these tips:

  1. Eliminate the snow and ice on your car’s roof, hood and windows.
  2. Check weather and traffic before you head out.
  3. Carry a cellphone always and let someone know where you are going.
  4. Store an emergency kit in your car with food, water, first aid, and blanket.
  5. Wear a seat belt at all times.

Also, remember that you are not the only person on the road. You also have to look out for other drivers as well because there will be accidents.

  1. Don’t follow a car too closely.
  2. Turn headlights on when out in stormy conditions.
  3. Drive at slow speeds when on icy roads and bridges.
  4. Let off the gas if your car starts to slide.
  5. Be courteous to others. They don’t enjoy being out in the weather either.

Nehls Chevrolet hopes you stay safe this holiday season. If there is ever anything you need before your travels, our service and parts department is only a visit or phone call away.

Teen Driver Safety Starts with the Parents

Teen Driver Safety Tips
Teen driver safety starts with the parents.

While it can be the shining moment in a teenager’s world, getting the car keys is only the first step of learning to drive.

National Teen Driver Safety Week is a yearly time set by Congress to encourage teenagers to drive safely and good passenger behavior. This year’s theme centered on how teenagers need their parents in order to transform into safe drivers.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), a teenager was involved in a deadly car crash every 2 hours in 2011. In that same year, 5,000 teenagers were a part of fatal car accidents, leading to 1,900 deaths and 180,000 injuries behind the wheel.

With these statistics in mind, Nehls Chevrolet encourages parents to work with their teenagers by teaching and supervising them and enforcing rules.

In order to accomplish this mission, here are some tips for parents:

1. Patience. Remain respectful and calm while giving criticism and advice to your teen.

2. At least 65 hours of supervised driving. Keep a driving log and create a driving lesson timeline to guarantee that your teens get to experience lots of different driving situations.

3. Setting rules. Clearly communicate the dos and don’ts (ex. driving time restrictions, prohibiting cell phone use and number of passengers).

4. Being a role model driver. Follow the laws of the road and speed limit. Wear your seatbelt always. Don’t use your cell phone when driving.

5. Knowing and teaching what’s crucial. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia found through a study that 75% of serious teen accidents happened because of a critical teen driver error.